The Bhagavad Gita for Landscape Photography

日本語

Nikon D810A + AF-S 14-24mm f/2.8G ED

Nikon D810A + AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8G ED

Listening to audiobooks has been one of my favourite activities for nearly a decade. It is a great pleasure to gain knowledge while driving, walking, jogging, cocking, and ironing shirts like a character in a novel by Haruki Murakami. Lately I started listening to audiobooks while shooting landscape photographs. Because you often need to wait for the right moment when shooting landscapes, there’s nothing left to do until you press the shutter button after you set up your tripod and camera. So I was listening to the Bhagavad Gita translated into English by Eknath Easwaran while shooting the sunset yesterday.

A brief description for those who are not familiar with the Bhagavad Gita: The Bhagavad Gita is an ancient Indian text which is part of the epic Mahabharata. The Gita is a dialogue between the supreme guru Krishna and his disciple Arjuna, who is facing the duty as a warrior to fight his relatives. In Hinduism, Vishnu descends to Earth in a from of an avatar to restore the world. Krishna is said to be  the eighth avatar of Vishunu, Buddha is referred to as the ninth avatar, and the tenth (and last) avatar Kalki is predicted to appear in the future .

Lord Krishna says:

“You have the right to work, but never to the fruit of work. You should never engaged in action, nor should you long for inaction. Perform work in this world, Arjuna, as a man established within himself — without selfish attachments ,and a like in success and defeat. For yoga is perfect evenness of mind.” (2:47-48)

I saw thin clouds over Mt. Fuji and left the house in anticipation of a dramatic sunset. Yes, I went to Lake Yamanaka because I expected a good result. In a strict sense, this action seems to indicate attachment to a good result. But it can also be regarded as part of my dharma (duty).

Nikon D800E + AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8E ED VR

Nikon D800E + AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8E ED VR

As a photographer, I should try my best to take good photographs making full use of my knowledge and skills. But, once I make a decision on where and when to shoot, I just take care of things I have control over such as finding the best composition and getting perfect focus and appropriate exposure. Then I detach from the result: “I may capture a beautiful sunset or maybe it will be mediocre. But in either way, I will be content.” How nature changes its appearance is beyond my control, and I shouldn’t worry about things I have no control over.

I’d like to point out the fact that yoga mentioned in the quotation from the Gita doesn’t mean physical exercises. In the West, the physical postures (asanas) of Hatha yoga (one of the branches of yoga) became very popular and now people call such physical exercises yoga. In my opinion, it’s as absurd as calling the act of sitting on a floor zen. In this part of the Bhagavad Gita, Krishna talks about Karma yoga, which is is the process of attaining Nirvana in action. The Bhagavad Gita also teaches two other paths to self-realisation (Bhakti yoga and Jnana yoga), but I don’t write about them for now.

This was how far I could apply the knowledge of the Gita to my photography. I’m sure I will gain more insights from this ancient wisdom and apply them to my everyday life as I read (and listen to) it over and over. But I can safely say that it wasn’t too difficult to detach from the fruit of my action in this case since I love nature in any form.

Nikon D810A + AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8G ED

Nikon D810A + AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8G ED

The exposure time of the above shot is 300 seconds and I had to wait for another 300 seconds for noise reduction. So it took 600 seconds (10 minutes) all together. It gets cold in winter in the area and I don’t use my Kindle when the temperature is below the freezing point. But it is getting warmer now. I find Kindle is quite useful when waiting for a very long exposure to finish after sunset or before dawn as it lets you read books in the pitch dark. Perhaps it is also a good idea to meditate while waiting for a very long exposure to finish. But I wouldn’t do it in Yamanakako as this area isn’t that deserted and I may appear too far-out. I meditate in nature when trekking in the backcountry.

風景写真とバガヴァッドギーター

Nikon D810A + AF-S 14-24mm f/2.8G ED

Nikon D810A + AF-S  Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8G ED

オーディオブックを日常的に聞く習慣がついてもう10年近く経つ。ドライブや散歩やジョギングなど集中力をあまり要求されないタスクをこなしているときにBGM代わりに聞くだけで、新たな知識を得ることができるので日常生活の大きな楽しみのひとつになっている。ここ数年は日本語のタイトルも増えてきたが、英語圏におけるオーディオブック市場の大きさは圧倒的だ。ある程度のセールスがあった本はすべてオーディオブック版も作られていて、最新のフィクションから古典まで楽しめる。というわけで近頃は写真撮影をしているときも一通り設定が終わると、オーディオブックを聞きながらシャッターを切る瞬間を待つのだが、ここ数日はエクナス・ イスワランがサンスクリット語から英語に訳した『バガヴァッド・ギーター』を聞きながら過ごしている。

『バガヴァッド・ギーター』は紀元前3世紀頃に書かれた聖典で、『マハーバーラタ』という巨大な叙事詩の一部となっている。マハトマ・ガンディーをはじめとする多くの偉人達に多大な影響を与えてきたのだが、日本ではそれほどポピュラーではないかもしれない。肉親との骨肉の争いに直面して「もうこんな戦いは嫌だ」と泣き言をならべるアルジュナ王子を彼の師匠であるクリシュナ(ヴィシュヌ神の8番目の化身)が叱咤激励しつつ解脱への道を解説してしまうと言うストーリーだ。ちなみにインドではお釈迦様(仏陀)はヴィシュヌの9番目の化身といわれていて、化身を意味するサンスクリット語のアヴァタラ(अवतार)は英語のアヴァター(avatar)の語源にもなっている。

クリシュナ曰く

『君の職務は行為そのものであり結果ではない。結果を目的にしてはいけない。無為に執着してもいけない。アルジュナよ、執着を捨て義務を遂行するのだ。成功と失敗は同一であると知れ。完全なる心の平静をヨガはもたらす』

富士の向こうに薄雲がかかっていたので劇的な夕焼けを期待して家を出た。良い結果を期待して撮影に出かけたわけなので、結果を目的にしていると解釈できてしまうが、絵になる風景を求めて撮影に出かけるというのは写真家のダルマ(職務)の範疇にはいる行為だろう。

Nikon D800E + AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8E ED VR

Nikon D800E + AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8E ED VR

自分の知識や経験にもとづいて、撮りたい絵が撮れる可能性が高い場所に向かうというのは風景写真家ならば当然おこなうべき行為だ。しかし、人間が自然現象をコントロールすることは不可能である以上、ひとたび撮影場所と時間を決定したら、自分で制御可能なことのみに専念する。たとえば、そのシーンを切り抜く最良の画角の選択だとか、構図をいろいろと試すとか、フォーカスをしっかり合わせるとか、露出を適切に設定するとかそういうところで最善を尽くす。劇的な夕焼けが訪れるか、月並みな夕暮れで終わるかはコントロールの埒外であり、そういうことに一喜一憂しないで、結果がどうであれ自分自身の行為に満足するように心がける。

ちなみにここで言う「ヨガ」とはフィットネスクラブで行う体操ではない。西洋や日本では「ハタヨガ」という流派の「アーサナ」と呼ばれるポーズの事をヨガと呼んでいるが、床に座ることを禅と呼ぶようなもので、ヨガという言葉の本来の意味と懸隔している。ここでクリシュナが説いているのは、行為を通して悟りへと至る「カルマヨガ」であり、フィットネスのエクササイズのことではない(だがエクササイズという行為そのものにカルマヨガを応用することは可能かもしれない)。バガヴァッド・ギーターの後半ではクリシュナへの絶対帰依を通して解脱へと至る「バクティヨガ」や叡智を通して悟りへと至る「ニャーナヨーガ」についても説かれているが、今回は触れません。個人的にはニャーナという響きは猫っぽくて好きですが。

This was how far I could apply the knowledge of the Gita to my photography. I’m sure I will gain more insights from this ancient wisdom and apply them to my everyday life as I read (and listen to) it over and over. But I can safely say that it wasn’t too difficult to detach from the fruit of my action in this case since I love nature in any form.

5 thoughts on “The Bhagavad Gita for Landscape Photography

  1. Raju

    Hello yuga san, I saw one of your photograph clicked while climbing season of Mount Fuji with Milky Way view..could you please Share the location from where you click that image?

    Reply
    1. yuga Post author

      Thanks for the comment. But I’ve taken a lot of photos of Mt. Fuji with the milky way and I don’t know which photo you are referring to. As a rule, you can take such photos from the north or the north east in summer. Good luck.

      Reply

Leave a Reply to Vinit Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *