Tag Archives: fuji

My photo is in Windows Spotlight

Mt. Fuji in Black and White by Yuga Kurita

Mt. Fuji in Black and White by Yuga Kurita

My photo is featured in Windows Spotlight (Windows 10 lock screen) and some people seem to want to use it as a wallpaper. So I uploaded the file on this website. Click this link to download the image.For personal use only. You may download it but you may not upload the downloaded image.

To license this image, visit Getty Images.

Windowsスポットライト(Windows 10のロック画面)で採用された私の写真を壁紙で使いたいという方がいるようですので、2560×1440ピクセルのイメージをダウンロードできるようにしておきました。壁紙や待ち受け等の個人使用の場合は無料でご利用いただけます。ダウンロードした画像を許可なくアップロードするのはご遠慮ください。広告等で利用する場合はライセンス料が発生します。

この画像のライセンスはゲッティイメージズにてご購入いただけます。

5 Reasons Why You Gotta Come to Fujigoko in Autumn

日本語

Yuga Kurita Kawaguchiko Fujisan Maple Trees_KS14974Nikon D600 + AF-S Nikkor 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5G ED
Nov 8, 2013 at Kuwazaki, Lake Kawaguchi

If you plan to come to Japan in autumn, I’d definitely recommend you to visit the Fujigoko area in Yamanashi prefecture. Here’s the top 5 reasons:

1) The air is cleaner and Fuji is more visible than summer!
A lot of people visit the area in summer and are often disappointed that they can’t see Fuji. Even people living in the area like me,  sometimes can’t see Fujisan for weeks. So the chance for you to see Fujisan in this season is quite slim.

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Alpine Shooting in Winter (2)

日本語

Yuga Kurita Mount Fuji from Southern Alps Akaishi Mountains Mount Eboshidake Nikon_4E04130Nikon D800E w/ AF-S Nikkor 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5G ED

This is the second part of the story. Read it after the first part.

It was snowing at the top of Mount Eboshidake. It was very windy too. I could barely see a thing. I went down. But after 40 minutes of walk, the sky suddenly cleared up and I got direct sunlight for the first time in the mountain. I debated myself whether to go back to the summit to shoot Fuji or go down to the parking lot. The time was 1:00PM. It was almost midwinter. The sun sets much earlier than summer. I only had 3 and a half hours of daylight. Going back to the top and shooting Fuji with sunset means I would have to stay near the summit for a night. I wavered in my decision. I decided to leave the mountain just 40 minutes ago. Once you decide to go home and think about relaxing in a hot bath, it isn’t easy to determine to go back into the snowstorm.  The sky may turn back to grey while I’m climbing.  I looked up. Thin clouds were moving fast. Sometimes they turned into rainbow colours by the sunlight.

Yuga Kurita Rainbow Clouds Southern Alps_DSC0756Nikon D5300 w/ AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G 

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Alpine Shooting in Winter (1)

日本語Yuga Kurita Mount Fuji Southern Alps December Winter_DSC0785Nikon D5300 w/ AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G

Shooting Fujisan seems to be one of the favourite activities for retired people. Famous shooting locations are getting more and more crowded with old people.  I want to believe that everyone who loves Fujisan is a good person. But sometimes it is not true. I often pick up trash thrown away by some of such amateur photographers. They don’t throw away trash at popular places where their deeds are witnessed by other people. They reveal their true personality when they’re seen by no one. That’s what mindless jerks does. Some take pictures from the back of the spots with wide angle lenses and try to chase off everyone comes into the frame. I’ve heard someone actually did such even to people who came earlier to the spot than him, saying “I always shoot Fuji from this position. You guys must go away.” But his ‘place’ was owned by someone else. Some get furious when someone briefly lights his camera with a headlight or penlight. If he really doesn’t want any artificial light to enter his camera, I think he should shoot in back-countries. I’m sick of all of this. I wanted to stay away from them. I wanted to be all alone in nature.

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I Climbed Mt. Akaishidake and Met a Japanese Serow!

日本語YUGA KURITA Japanese Serow_9E40668Nikon D800E w/ SIGMA ART 24-105mm f/4 DG OS HSM

The Japanese serows are rare animals. It is quite rare to see them even for a person like me who often lurks in mountains. They went nearly extinct in the 50’s. The Japanese government designated them as a “Special National Monument” and prohibited the hunting of the serow. Since then, the number of the serows increased. If you’re lucky, you might meet them in the country like I did.

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Come to think of it, it’s the equinox day!

日本語

YUGA KURITA Mount Fuji Taikanzan Dawn_DSC7785
Nikon D5300 w/ AF-S Nikkor 18-140mm f3.5-5.6G ED VR

According to the weather report, it is going to be fine and Fuji will probably be visible. I hate shooting in a crowded place in weekends. It is a Tuesday. I’ll probably enjoy shooting Fuji without being bothered by anyone.

I somehow wanted to go to Taikanzan, a popular vantage point to admire Fuji in Hakone. This place was haunted by legendary Japanese painter Taikan Yokoyama as he loved drawing Mt. Fuji from here. This mountain was originally called Daikanzan but was changed into Taikanzan in memory of the great painter after he died. That’s the story written in guidebooks. I’ve never found any authentic sources to prove the story though.

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Do evening primroses really look very well in the landscape of Mt Fuji?

日本語

YUGA KURITA Mount Fuji SIGMA DP2 Quattro _P2Q0047 富士には月見草がよく似合う
Photo taken with SIGMA DP2 QUATTRO

Japanese literary giant in the Taisho/Showa era, Osamu Dazai wrote in his popular novel “Fugaku Hyakkei (One Hundred Views of Mount Fuji)”, “Tsukimisou (evening primroses/oenothera tetraptera) really look very well in the landscape of Mt Fuji.” Honestly speaking, I’ve never read any English translation of the novel, so I’m not sure if the exact same sentence actually appear in your book. Anyway, he said something like that. But, in fact, he didn’t see Fuji and evening primroses together with his eyes. When he was returning from Fujiyoshida to Misaka Touge, he witnessed people on the bus were very delighted to see magnificent Fujiyama through the windows. Then he found an old woman sitting on the other side of the bus gazing at the other side from Fujisan. Dazai sympathised with the old woman. He did the same and saw evening primroses blooming on the other side from Fuji, and then, said “Evening primroses really look very well in the landscape of Mt Fuji.” Meaning that, he never saw evening primroses together with Fuji in the same landscape.

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