Alpine Shooting in Winter (2)

日本語

Yuga Kurita Mount Fuji from Southern Alps Akaishi Mountains Mount Eboshidake Nikon_4E04130Nikon D800E w/ AF-S Nikkor 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5G ED

This is the second part of the story. Read it after the first part.

It was snowing at the top of Mount Eboshidake. It was very windy too. I could barely see a thing. I went down. But after 40 minutes of walk, the sky suddenly cleared up and I got direct sunlight for the first time in the mountain. I debated myself whether to go back to the summit to shoot Fuji or go down to the parking lot. The time was 1:00PM. It was almost midwinter. The sun sets much earlier than summer. I only had 3 and a half hours of daylight. Going back to the top and shooting Fuji with sunset means I would have to stay near the summit for a night. I wavered in my decision. I decided to leave the mountain just 40 minutes ago. Once you decide to go home and think about relaxing in a hot bath, it isn’t easy to determine to go back into the snowstorm.  The sky may turn back to grey while I’m climbing.  I looked up. Thin clouds were moving fast. Sometimes they turned into rainbow colours by the sunlight.

Yuga Kurita Rainbow Clouds Southern Alps_DSC0756Nikon D5300 w/ AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G 

UP

I made a decision to go back to the top and shoot Fuji.Years ago, I would hate my life because I knew I didn’t live fully. I gotta break down the status quo.  I wanted to challenge my limits.

My My Hey Hey
Rock and roll is here to stay
It’s better to burn out
Than to fade away
My My Hey Hey

I sang “My My Hey Hey” by Neil Young while going back to the top. The song was devoted to Johnny Rotten. But, for our generation, it became famous when Kurt Cobain quoted the lyrics in his suicide note. When I was young, adult people told me you would listen to Enka when you are old. No way! I’ll keep rocking till I die. Because I already walked the footpath twice today, it was quite easy to reach back to the top. It is hardest when you are the first one and have to create a path towards the top. Let’s respect pioneers in every field.

Yuga Kurita Mount Fuji Southern Alps December_DSC0766Nikon D5300 w/ AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G

WOW! Fuji came into my sight when I reached the ridge leading to the summit.  I took out my Nikon D5300 from the waist pouch in a rush and took this shot. You never know when Fuji will hide again. I dumped my backpack and also took out my D800E from it to shoot wide angles shots. After all the hustle, I finally saw Fuji. Thank God! I sat down and gazed at Fuji for a while.

Yuga Kurita Mount Fuji Southern Alps December_4E04136Nikon D800E w/ AF-S Nikkor 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5G ED

After experimenting with all compositions I wanted to capture, I moved to the top of Mt. Eboshidake. I could see Mt. Shiomi (3,047m) located just next. But the top of Mt. Shiomi was hidden by clouds. Clouds came in front of me to block Mt. Fuji from my view while I was standing on the top. Still I could see Mt. Ogouchidake and the bothie near the summit. I thought I would be able to reach there by sunset. I put my D800E into the backpack and left the top of Mt. Eboshidake.

After walking for a minute, I was hit by a very strong wind. I managed to resist the wind and waited for the wind to die down. 5 seconds, 10 seconds, 30 seconds, 1 minute… What!? It never gets weaker. I concluded that winds are very strong on this alpine ridge today. It was not a temporal phenomenon. I immediately gave up my plan to go to Mt. Ogouchidake and stay at the bothie. I love challenging my limits but I don’t wanna do suicidal acts. These are different things, right? I determined to stay at Mt. Eboshidake to shoot sunset and make a bivouac near the summit. I’ll shoot Fuji from Mt. Ogouchidake when the conditions are better.

Yuga Kurita Bivouac Southern Alps KIMG0100Kyocera Tough Smartphone TORQUE

I found a place where I could avoid strong winds near the summit and prepared for a bivouac. I set my Outdoor Research Alpine Bivy, and put my Mont-Bell sleeping bag in it. I tied the bivy to a nearby tree with a rope. I also used my Black Diamond Ice Axe to peg down the bivy. I prefer a bivy to a tent because I want to sleep near the shooting points.  It has better wind resistance and requires less flat space. I can walk just by 25m from this place to shoot Fuji. Although the wind was much weaker than the summit, still a relatively strong wind blew at times.

Yuga Kurita Mount Fuji Southern Alps December_4E04174Nikon D800E w/ AF-S Nikkor 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5G ED

Sometimes, clouds blocked Fuji from my view but Fuji showed up again at dusk. Alpenglow turned the white mountains wall pink.  Only those who climbed high mountains in winter can see it.

Yuga Kurita Southern Alps Sunset_DSC0799Nikon D5300 w/ AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G

I turned back and was surprised at the burning sky. It felt as if I was watching Jupiter from Io. After shooting the sunset, Fuji hid behind clouds. I gave up shooting at night and crawled into my bivy sack. It will be a long night. It was still 6:00PM.

Well, my bivy sack may look like a plastic coffin. You may think  it is impossible to sleep in such but it is possible if you are tired enough to sleep like a corpse. I set an alarm for every two hours to briefly check out the conditions so I knew it started to snow at night. I anticipated that it would stop by sunrise and I would be able to shoot Fuji in the morning.  I stayed in the bivy till 5 O’clock in the morning. It was a mistake.

When I opened the zipper of the bivy, a lot of snow came into it. I managed to get out of the bivy and saw that my backpack was buried in snow. It snowed heavily. The mountains have had at least 50cm (20 inches) of snow and it was still snowing. I regret to tell you but I took no photograph on this day (Dec. 4), because I was on the verge of being lost. Not a single photo. I didn’t even use my smartphone to take a photo since it also served as the GPS receiver and map. I didn’t want to waste battery for activities not contributing to my survival.

Since it was snowing, I gave up shooting Fuji in the morning and started pack up my backpack. It was freezing. The temperature was almost -20 Celsius (-4 Fahrenheit). I tried to do it quickly but I felt I was all thumbs. My brain didn’t work very efficiently. It took two hours for me to get ready to leave there. When I woke up, it was pitch-dark. But the black world had already turned dark grey. The sun already rose but thick clouds blocked the sunlight and I didn’t get any direct sunlight on this day.

They say that descending is more difficult than ascending in winter mountains. I confirmed it is true particularly when it is heavily snowing!  If it hadn’t snowed, I could’ve easily retrace my own footsteps. But they were all gone. The snow was waist-high and deeper in some places. I needed to spend a minute to move ahead 10 meters.  I lost sight of the footpath. Everything was white. I slid down a steep slope to the dale. Then, I headed to the Sanpuku pass using the compass and GPS.

Don’t panic! I remembered the wise phrase written on the cover of my favourite book, “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.” In a desperate situation, those who are panicking die first. Well, even if you don’t panic, still you might die. But there’s much more probability of survival. “Don’t worry. You have a towel too.” I encouraged myself.  If I arrive at the Sanpuku pass, I’m sure I won’t die. I can stay there for another night and go down tomorrow. According to the map on my Android smartphone, the Sanpuku pass is near. But I couldn’t see anything that I saw on my way to the summit. All that I could do was trust the compass and GPS.

I felt a deep sense of relief when I saw fences protecting alpine plants. I remembered that I saw them when climbing. I also saw a wooden sign board. I hate seeing artificial objects in mountains. But this time, it was a relief to see them. I was returning back to the trail. In summer, you can reach the Sanpuku pass by 5 minutes from here. But now the snow and my backpack is so heavy that I needed to spend another 30 minutes. It was already 1 O’Clock in the afternoon when I eventually arrived at the Sanpuku pass. But it was an immense relief. At least, I’m not gonna be a missing person.

I entered the winter hut at the Sanpuku pass and cooked ramen. If the weather had been calm, I’d have took a break outside. I had to put off the crampons, gaiters and shoes, and then, had to put them on again when leaving the hut. While eating ramen, I noticed that I got a huge blister on my left foot. When I did a trial fitting at a shoe shop, my winter shoes (La Sportiva Nepal EVO GTX)  fitted perfectly with my feet. I wanted more affordable ones but I chose them since they fitted best. You never know how well your shoes work for you unless you actually use them in mountains. The shoelaces were easily undone. I had to lace up the shoes many times in the mountain. Later, I realised they easily came loose because I didn’t put the tongues in the right way. I should’ve shook them down in lower mountains before using them in the Southern Alps. Then, I could probably avoid the problems. I joined a photowalk held at Mt. Takao just before coming here. I thought Nepal EVO was an overkill for Takao-san and wore Mont-Bell’s hiking shoes. After I came back home, I searched on how to lace up shoes firmly and found this video on YouTube.

Although I struggled in the snow for several hours, I wasn’t too tired. I debated whether to keep walking down or stay at the hut for another night. I could say that it was already 1:30PM and it was still 1:30PM and both were true. When I was climbing, the amount of snow dramatically increased around this place. I thought it meant that I could walk faster after passing this place. The hut had no window and was very cold. I thought it was even colder than the outside. All that I could do in this place was lie down in my sleeping bag. I had just been in my sleeping bag for 11 hours last night. It was still too early for me to do it again.

I decided to keep walking down. I expected it would be impossible to walk back to my car before it gets dark. But it would be an easy way if I could manage to reach the end of the forest road.

IMG_20141202_150139Kyocera Tough Smartphone TORQUE

I’m proud of the fact that I’m an optimist. But, as far as this trip is concerned, it caused me to make a mistake. The amount of the snow was roughly the same even after passing the Sanpuku Toge. Planked paths are useful when climbing mountains in summer. But they are dangerous in snowy winter. Snow completely covered them so you never see gaps between steps. You may fall down if you put your foot on the wrong place. I spent a lot of time to walk over them. There was, however, not much risk of losing sight of the footpath after passing the Sanpuku pass. I just couldn’t tell what was under the snow, rocks, the roots of trees or the ground. I couldn’t walk fast. When I arrived at the watering place, it already got dark, although I haven’t even reached half the way. I originally planned to reach the end of the forest road by now. I gave a bitter laugh to my own optimistic plan. But the water tasted well. By the way, this photo was taken on my way up. It was completely buried in the snow and I had to dig it from the snow.

Again I debated whether to keep walking down with a headlight or make a bivouac at this place. Then I noticed that my gloves were wet. My ISUKA Weathertech gloves are supposed to be waterproof. I tested them with tap water and they worked as advertised. But I had trudged through snow for 8 hours. It probably exceeded the max water pressure resistance. I brought several gloves but I made all of them wet except for red fleece mittens by Mont-Bell. I should’ve changed the gloves at this point but I was careless enough to keep wearing the wet gloves for some more hours and ended up getting frostbite. They are getting better now but still some of my fingers are numb while I’m writing this blog post now.

I made another mistake. I left the summit wearing my down parka under the hardshell because it was freezing. Sweat came out of my body made it wet. It now has much less thermal performance. You should never walk winter mountains wearing down clothes. Making clothes wet in high winter mountains where the temperature never goes up the freezing point causes fatal problems. My sleeping bag was also a little wet due to dew condensation at night. I’m not gonna freeze to death if I make a bivouac here. But I can imagine it would be a freezing night. I determined to keep walking with a headlight. I was tired but didn’t want to sleep there. Fortunately, I’m used to darkness since I shoot starscapes often.

I kept walking down to about 2300 meters. But the amount of snow didn’t change much. I began to worry about my car. I hoped it wasn’t buried by snow and the winter gate of the forest road leading to the parking lot was not closed. Still, I know I will be relieved when I arrive at my car. I have water, a gas cartridge and down vest in the car. Since The passenger seat can be folded completely flat.  It would be much more comfortable than making a bivouac around here.

My headlight ran out of the batteries and started to dim at a a col at 2200m. I always carry a spare headlight and spare batteries for serious mountaineering. When I determined to specialise in Mount Fuji and moved from Tokyo to Fujiyoshida, I started to climb mountains around Fujisan. The first mountain I climbed as a photographer was Mount Shakushi (1596m) in my neighbourhood. It is not a low mountain but my house is located at nearly 800m high. So the difference is only 800m. I thought it would be very easy. I climbed it without carrying rainwear or headlight. It was much tougher than expected, at least for me at that time. I picked up a broken branch to use it as a walking stick. When I finally reached the summit, it suddenly started to rain.  The sun went down while I was walking down in rain. But I forgot to bring a headlight so I had to struggle through pitch darkness using my iPhone as a flashlight.  Since then, I always carry rainwear and a headlight. It was a good lesson. You need such a bitter experience before attempting serious mountaineering. I searched my waist bag to take out the spare headlight to no avail. I dumped my backpack and looked for it but still I couldn’t find the headlight. Damn, it’s a pitch-dark night. What to do? I remembered the wise phrase “Don’t Panic.” and took a deep breath. Now I noticed the moon is bright tonight. Everything is gonna be all right, I murmured. I put my hands into the pockets of my Mont-bell synthetic insulation jacked that I wore inside the down parka and found the spare headlight and battery.

I also took off the crampons from the shoes at this place. The slopes were not too steep anymore.  I thought it would be easier to walk without them. But it was a mistake. I fell down dozen times after taking them off.

I was almost crying at midnight. Each time I fell down, I took it out on trees and rocks. Now I think I was stupid but when I was experiencing this, I had no room to breathe. I went as far as I could go and was facing my limits. Just then, I reached the end of the forrest road. According to the map (山と高原地図 I recommend you to get this map and check out the Japanese words written on it in advance if you want to do serious mountaineering without a guide in Japan), it takes 40 minutes from here to the parking lot. I know it is not applied to me. It snowed heavily, my backpack is massive, and I’m completely exhausted. Still, walking down this road is much easier compared to the snowy, slippery footpath I had just been.

KIMG0103Kyocera Tough Smartphone TORQUE

I summoned up my last ounce of strength and walked down the forrest road. Since the car is near, I didn’t want to sleep on the road. At 3:30AM, I finally arrived at the parking lot. I wanted to drive down to a lower place as It was still snowing. But I couldn’t do anything but collapse into the flat seat due to the extreme fatigue. I left the summit of Mt. Eboshidake at 8:00AM and now it is 3:30AM next day. I took some breaks on my way but I walked at least 18 hours. It sounded crazy. I bet even the Israelites led by Moses didn’t walk this much on a single day. I just broke my record of longest walk I made at Mt. Akaishidake weeks ago. In my twenties, I was a backpacker and walked a lot. I hadn’t done any trekking even while I was in Nepal though. Back then, I tried to change the status quo and go beyond my limits. Looking back, I guess my limits weren’t high. Still I tried hard to change my life. In my thirties, I tried to create something great as a recording artist and failed, meanwhile I succeeded to make a living as a freelance translator under severe economic conditions. I succeeded to survive in the capitalism world but failed to achieve anything remarkable as a creator in my thirties. I’m 43 years old. I challenged myself in the mountains and am content of the result. Now I want to challenge myself as a creator. It’s better to burn out than to fade away. I want to burn out as an artist rather than as an alpinist.

According to the map, it takes only about 3 hours from the top of Mt. Eboshidake to the parking lot in summer. I expected that it wouldn’t take more than two times even when it was snowing. I was ignorant and stupid but learned a good lesson.

The parking lot is located at 1650m high. The temperature went below -10 Celsius (14F) but I slept very well thanks to the Mont-Bell sleeping bag and Thermarest sleeping pad (RidgeRest SoLite / Solar) I recommend them for those who often sleep in their cars in winter.  It was pitch-dark when I arrived at the car. I took the above photo after waking up.

_DSC0801Nikon D5300 w/ AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G

I felt secure for the first time after leaving the summit when I reached Route 152 after driving down the snowy, frozen, slippery forrest road. I parked the car in front of a public restroom to do the deed and saw a cool signboard saying “Deer Eater” in Japanese. It looked fascinating but I wasn’t hungry at all. I headed for Takabocchi to shoot Fujisan. I noticed that some of my fingers were numb while driving to Takabocchi. I placed them in front of the outlets of the air conditioner. I should’ve gone straight to a hot spring before going to another shooting location. I felt as if I cut my nails too short. I didn’t know that the feeling was the sign of frostbite. Wether or not you notice the sign of frostbite, it is a good idea to go straight to hot springs when you come down from a mountain in winter. Now I’m planning my next mountaineering expedition. I’m making a plan according to the weather forecast. I’m addicted to mountaineering. No human beings around me, away from the human society, I get something I’ve always wanted.


Yuga Kurita Rainbow Clouds Southern Alps_DSC0756Nikon D5300 w/ AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G 


厳しくも美しい南アルプス(後編)

Yuga Kurita Mount Fuji from Southern Alps Akaishi Mountains Mount Eboshidake Nikon_4E04130Nikon D800E w/ AF-S Nikkor 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5G ED

このポストは後編です。前編はこちら。

吹雪いてきて視界がなかったので、下山したのだが、40分ほど降りたら急に晴れだした。頂上に戻って富士山を撮影するのか、それともこのまま下山するのか、僕は選択を迫られた。もう13:00だ。冬至が近く日は短い。あと3時間半で日の入りである。頂上に戻って夕焼けを狙うなら、山頂近くに一泊しないとならない。僕は迷った。一度「帰るモード」に入ってしまうと、また攻めるという気分になかなかならない。当たり前だが、何の保証もないのだ。山頂に戻っても、また曇りだして富士山は見えないかもしれない。ふと空を見上げると、薄い雲がすごい勢いで流れていく。時折、太陽の光を浴びて虹のように輝くのが美しい。

「行こう!」

僕は山頂に戻ることを決断した。自分の人生の不完全燃焼感がずっと嫌だった。自分の限界にチャレンジしたい。

My My Hey Hey

Rock and roll is here to stay

It’s better to burn out

Than to fade away

My My Hey Hey

ニール・ヤングの「My My Hey Hey」を口ずさみながら、山頂への道をまた登る。セックスピストルズのジョニー・ロットンに捧げられた曲だが、僕らの世代にはカート・コベインが遺書で引用した曲と言ったほうが通りが良いかもしれない。若い頃は、日本人なんだから年を取ったら演歌を聴くようになるよ、と言われたがとんでもない。俺は一生ロックだ! 本日3回目なので、既に自分の足跡で踏み均されていて、最初に登った時よりはずいぶんと楽だった。

Yuga Kurita Mount Fuji Southern Alps December_DSC0766Nikon D5300 w/ AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G

うぉおおっ! 山頂へと続く稜線に這い上がると富士山が視界に飛び込んできた。慌ててウェストバッグからD5300を撮りだして撮影する。今のうちに撮っておかねば、いつ隠れるかわからない。その場にザックをおろして、中からD800Eも撮りだしてすぐに広角で撮影した。ふぅ〜やっと富士山が撮れた。感無量で、思わず座り込んでしまった。

Yuga Kurita Mount Fuji Southern Alps December_4E04136Nikon D800E w/ AF-S Nikkor 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5G ED

とりあえずひと通り撮影したので、烏帽子岳山頂へと向かった。塩見岳は一応見えていたが、上の方に雲がかかっている。山頂についてしばらく経つと富士山も見えなくなってしまった。しかし、視界は良好で、小河内岳の避難小屋も肉眼でハッキリと見える。このまま小河内岳まで行けそうだ。D800Eを再びザックにしまいこんで、小河内岳へと続く稜線を歩き始めた。

ほんの30mほど降りたところで、風速20mは優に超えそうな猛烈な風が吹き出した。体重の軽い人だったら、吹き飛ばされて滑落していたかもしれない。ああ、ちょっとポッチャリ気味で良かった。痩せていたらきっと死んでいた。 こうやって命懸けの撮影をするために、仕方なくキャラメルポップコーンを大量に食べているのです。とりあえず、覚えたての耐風姿勢をとってやり過ごすことにする。5秒、10秒、30秒、1分… あれ? 一向に風が弱くならない! どうもこの辺りは、一時的な強風ではなく、今日はずっとこのぐらいの風が吹いているらしい。この時点で、小河内岳まで行って避難小屋に泊まるという計画を捨てた。チャレンジは好きだが、無謀な自殺行為はまっぴらゴメンだ。烏帽子岳で夕焼けを撮ってから、風が弱い所でビバークするという計画に変更した。ちなみにビバークというのは登山用語で、緊急的・避難的な野営を意味する。小河内岳は、コンディションの良い日にリベンジしたい。

Yuga Kurita Bivouac Southern Alps KIMG0100Kyocera Tough Smartphone TORQUE

森林限界から稜線に出るあたりのところで、ビバークの準備をする。Outdoor Researchのビビィサック(一人用シェルター)の中にモンベルのシュラフを設置し。ビビィが風で飛ばされないようにロープで木に括りつける。Black Diamondのピッケルもペグ代わりに使う。絶好の撮影地のそばでビバークできるように、僕はテントではなくビビィを愛用している。テントというのは設置と撤収に手間が掛かるし、張れるだけのフラットなスペースを見つけるのが意外と大変だ。ビビィは居住性は皆無だが、耐環境性(特に耐風性)はテントより高い。ここからなら、ほんの数十メートル歩くだけで富士見ポイントまでいけて、風も山頂に比べるとだいぶ穏やかだ。とはいえ、吹くときは吹くので写真のような状態になることがしばしばあった。

Yuga Kurita Mount Fuji Southern Alps December_4E04174Nikon D800E w/ AF-S Nikkor 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5G ED

富士山は、隠れたり現れたりを繰り返していたが、夕方には再び現れてくれた。アルペングローでピンクになった南アルプスに富士山。冬のアルプスに登らないと撮れない景色です。

Yuga Kurita Southern Alps Sunset_DSC0799Nikon D5300 w/ AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G

後ろを振り返ると、ものすごく焼けていた。まるでイオから木星を眺めているような錯覚に陥りそうな夕焼けだった。この後、真っ暗になって富士山は隠れた。夜の撮影は諦めて、朝5時ぐらいから撮影を開始するつもりで、床に入った。

傍から見るとまるで遭難しているように見えるかもしれないが、ビビィは結構快適です。一応、状況をチェックしようと、二時間おきにアラームを掛けて寝た。夜半から雪が降りだしたのには気づいていたが、ひょっとしたら朝になったら止んでいるのではないか、という淡い期待を持って5時まで寝続けた。これが失敗だった。

朝起きて、ビビィのジッパーを開くと雪がどっかりと中に入って来た。外に出てみると相当積もったらしい。ピッケルは完全に埋まっていて、バックパックも雪で殆ど隠れていた。50cmほどは積もったようだ。そして、まだ雪は降り続いていた。大変申し訳無いが、この日(12/4)はスマホを含めて、写真を一枚も撮っていない。写真を撮る余裕がなかったのだ! よって、しばらくはテキストのみで事の顛末をお話したい。

雪が降っているので、朝の撮影は絶望的だった。とりあえず撤収の準備に掛かる。マイナス20度近い寒さで雪が降っている中、シュラフやビビィを収納したり、靴を履き替えたり、アイゼンを履いたりする作業はなかなか大変だ。モタモタしているうちに途中で明るくなってきた。と言っても、空は雪雲に覆われているので、黒が灰色になっただけで、青空なんて見えやしない。下山する準備がやっと整った時には8:00を過ぎていた。

ここからの下山が大変だった。冬山は登るより降りるほうが大変だという話を聞いたことがあるが、本当に大変だった。とはいえ、これは山中で大雪が降ったのが原因である。もし雪が降らなかったら、自分の足跡を辿って悠々と帰ることができただろう。腰上までの積雪の中ラッセルが延々と続いた。吹き溜まりなどでは脇まで雪に埋まる。例によって途中で登山道を完全に見失って、急坂を強引に降りた。その後はコンパスとGPSと地図を頼りに三伏峠を目指した。

「パニックになったら遭難する」そう思って、とにかく冷静に振る舞おうとした。最悪の場合はここの冬季小屋にもう一泊してから、帰ることができる。三伏峠にさえ辿り着けば死ぬことは無いだろう。地図で位置を確認するともう三伏峠はかなり近いはずなのに、進めども、進めども、行く時に見た見覚えのある風景は視界に入ってこない。しかし、GPSとコンパスを信じて進むしか無い。このタフスマホの電池がなくなったらおしまい。そう思うと途中で写真を撮る気にはなれない。

高山植物を保護するためのネットが見えた時には、心の底から安堵した。行く途中に見た覚えがあったからだ。そして、木でできた看板も見えた。夏場ならば、ここから三伏峠まで5分ほどだろうか? しかし、ここからが遠い。120リットルのザックを背負っての、腰上のラッセルは全く進まない。しかも、登山道から外れているので、雪の下にはハイマツがあったり岩があったりして歩きづらい。三伏峠にたどり着いた時には既に13:00近かった。

三伏峠の冬季小屋を借りて、ラーメンを作って食べた。しかし、冬場の休憩というのは面倒だ。靴とゲイターとアイゼンを脱いで、出るときにまた装着して… できることなら、風を避ける事ができる野外でそのまま休憩したかったが、雪が降っていて風もあったので厳しかった。この時に気がついたのだが、左足に直径6cmほどの巨大な豆ができていた。スポルティバの冬用登山靴(Nepal EVO GTX)は、試着した時には完璧なフィット感だったので、予算をオーバーしていたけどこれにした。しかし、靴というのは実戦で使ってみないとわからないものだ。まさか、豆ができてしまうとは。それに紐がほどけやすい。今回の山行中に5回以上ひもがほどけてしまった。しかし、帰ってきてから他の山に登った時に気がついたのだが、ほどけやすかったのはタンの位置が悪かったのが原因だったようだ。中にしっかりと入れてやる必要がある。今にして思えば、高尾山のフォトウォークに履いていって、足に慣らしておけばよかった。高尾山にこの靴を履いていくのは、いくらなんでもオーバースペック過ぎて恥ずかしいので、モンベルのハイキングシューズを履いていった。やはり靴というのは本番の前に慣らしておく必要があります。ちなみに、解けにくい靴紐の結び方を調べたので、次回の山行では試してみようと思う。

ラーメンを食べ終わってまた悩んだ。疲れたけれどまだまだ動ける。このまま下山し続けるか、ちょっと早いけどここでもう一泊するか? 登って来る時は三伏峠辺りで一気に積雪量が増えた。ということは、逆に言えばこれから下は意外と楽に降りれるのではないか? 窓のない冬季小屋の中は真っ暗な上、マイナス15度ほどの寒さで、シュラフの中で寒さを凌ぐ以外何もできそうもない。昨晩は11時間以上シュラフの中に入っていたので、またすぐにシュラフに入るというのは嫌だ。

という訳で、途中から雪の量が減って歩きやすくなることを期待して、降り続けることにした。明るいうちに車まで辿り着くことはできないだろうが、林道まで降りられれば、後は暗くても問題ないだろう。

IMG_20141202_150139Kyocera Tough Smartphone TORQUE

私は自分が楽観主義者であることに誇りを持っているが、今回については凶と出たかもしれない。三伏峠を過ぎても雪の量はあまり減らなかった。夏の間は登山者にとってとてもありがたい人工の桟道だが、これが雪山では恐ろしい。どこに隙間があるのか、全くわからないのだ。下手なところに足を着くと、そのまま下まで落ちてしまう。かなり時間を掛けて慎重に渡った。三伏峠から下は登山道がわかりやすいので、ルートから外れてしまうことは無かった。しかし、雪の下にあるのが、岩なのか、木なのか、土なのか、全く予測がつかないところが多い。こんな中ではハイペースで歩くことは不可能だ。七合目付近にある水場に着いた時は、既に日が暮れていた。日が暮れる前に林道まで出るつもりだった自分の計画の甘さに苦笑するしか無い。まぁ、しかし、水が飲めるだけでもありがたい。水は美味しかった。写真は行く途中に撮影したものです。帰りは完全に雪に埋もれていたので、掘り起こして飲んだ。

ここで、もう一度ビバークするか、暗い中をヘッドライトを点けて降り続けるか、しばし悩んだ。この時に、完全防水であるはずの手袋が濡れていることに気がついた。イスカのウェザーテック防水手袋で、台所の水道でテストした時は防水性に全く問題がなかった。しかし、8時間以上の雪中行動は想定外なのだろう。耐水圧の限界を超えてしまったようで、中にまで水が侵入していた。インナーの手袋もすべて濡らしてしまい、フリースのミトンだけがまだ乾燥していた。この時点ですぐに乾燥したミトンに変更すればよかったのに、しばらく濡れたイスカを使い続けてしまったため、凍傷に罹ってしまった。この記事を書いている現在も左手の薬指と小指に若干のしびれが残っている。そして、もう一つ失敗に気がついた。あまりにも寒かったので、ダウンのパーカーの上にハードシェルを着て降りていたのだ。体から発散される水蒸気がハードシェルのすぐ内側にあるダウンパーカーでとどまってしまい、ぐっしょりと濡れていた。これでは本来の保温性能の半分も出せないだろう。ダウンを着て行動してはいけない。常に氷点下にある冬の高山で濡らしてしまうということが、如何に致命的なことなのか身を持って学ばされた。シュラフも雪が降っている間に結露で結構濡れてしまったので、本来の性能は出ない。ビバークしても凍死することは無いだろうが、かなり寒い夜になりそうだ。想像するだけで身震いしてきたので、ヘッドライトを点けて降り続けることにした。幸い、星撮りをよくするので、夜目は利くし、闇に対する恐怖も少ない。

2400m、2300mと高度を下げてもあまり雪が減らない。車は動かせるだろうか? 林道は通行できるだろうか? と心配になってきた。それでも、車まで辿り着けば、水もあるし、予備のガス管もあるし、予備のダウンベストもある。フラットシートになるので、雪上でビバークするよりはだいぶ快適に眠れる。

2200m付近のコルのあたりで、ヘッドライトが暗くなりだした。もう、電池がないらしい。こんな事もあるので、本格的な山行には予備のヘッドライトと電池を必ず持参する。

東京から富士吉田に引っ越して来て最初に登ったのが、近所にある杓子山だ。近所の低山とはいえ1596mあるし、観光地ではないため誰も居ない。高尾山に登るようなつもりで登るべき山ではない。全く登山をしていなかったので、ちょっと登ったらすぐに筋肉が悲鳴をあげた。落ちていた枝を杖代わりにして山頂になんとか着いた頃に、急に雨が降りだした。ずぶ濡れになって降りてきたが、途中で暗くなってしまい、iPhoneを懐中電灯モードにしてなんとか降りることができた。やはり経験を通しての学びというのは大きい。いくら口で言われても苦い経験をしないと身につかないものだ。以来、登山に行くときはたとえ低山でもかならず合羽とヘッドライトを持参するようになった。登山のイロハを教えてくれた杓子山には感謝している。僕の原点だ。

予備のヘッドライトを取り出そうと、ウェストバックを探すが見当たらない。ザックを降ろして中をチェックしても見つからない。なんてこった。真っ暗だよ! パニックになってはいけない。深呼吸して空を見る。ああ、今になって気がづいたよ。今晩は月が明るいね。きっと大丈夫だ。落ち着いてミドルレイヤーにしている化繊ジャケットのポケットをチェックしたら入っていた。

ついでにこの辺りでアイゼンも外した。どうも外したほうが歩きやすい気がしたのだ。しかし、これは失敗で、この後、転びまくった。

深夜0時を回った頃には、もう泣きそうになっていた。滑って転ぶたびに岩や木に当たって怒っていた。今にして思えば、そんなことしても無駄なのに馬鹿な男だと思う。それだけ余裕がなかったのだろう。もう限界だ! 死んでしまう! というところで林道に出た。「山と高原地図」によるとここから駐車場までは40分。もちろん、雪が降っていなくて、極端に重い荷物を背負っていない時の目安だが、登山道に比べればはるかに歩きやすい。

KIMG0103Kyocera Tough Smartphone TORQUE

最後の気力を振り絞って、林道を歩き続けた。もう少しの辛抱だ。ここまで来たら車まで戻ってから休みたい。疲労困憊の極限状態で車に辿り着いた時は、午前3:30だった。朝の8時に山頂を出てから、ずーっと歩きっぱなしだ。体力的な疲労よりも、肩が痛い。いくらなんでもザックが重すぎだ。途中での休憩時間が合計1:30だとしても、30kg近い荷物を背負って18時間歩いていたことになる。「昔の人は偉いね〜 東海道とかずっと歩いてたんだって。信じられないよ!」なんて事をよく言っていたが、自分のほうがよほど信じられない。未来のことというのは、全くわからないものだ。自己最高記録の更新だった。更新された記録は先月赤石岳で作ったものだ。その前の記録は多分20代の頃インドで作ったと思う。そういえばあの頃もバックパックを担いで放浪していた。当時は登山はしなかったけど、限界近くまで自分なりに頑張っていた。30代は無気力で、ただ惰性で生きていた。と言ったら少し自分に厳しすぎるかもしれない。僕は30代の時、何か凄いものを創ろうとそれなりに努力したが、失敗した。肉体的なものだけが挑戦ではない。今回の山行が終わってみると、クリエイティブな方面でまた限界に挑戦したい、という気持ちがむくむくと湧いてきた。「失われた10年」という言葉を聞くと、自分の30代を思い出す。しかし、失敗を活かして、利子を付けて取り戻せばよいだけの話だ。まだ終わってない。『It’s better to burn out than to fade away』燃え尽きて、出し尽くしてから死にたい。

ちなみに、地図によると、夏場なら烏帽子岳の山頂から駐車場まで3時間ちょっとで降りれるそうだ。冬山で大雪が降ると本当に大変なことになる。雪山と言っても精々二倍の時間だろう、と高をくくっていたが、無知だった。

まだ雪が降っていたので、これ以上積もらないうちに車を移動したかったが、もう無理だった。とても運転どころではない。この状態で運転したらかなり危ないだろう。そのまま、車の中に倒れこんだ。駐車場まで降りてきたと言っても標高は1600m以上ある。マイナス10度以下まで冷え込んだようだ。しかし、山行用のマットレスとシュラフのお陰で暖かく熟睡できた。Thermarestのマットレス(RidgeRest SoLite / Solar)は車中泊派の人にもぜひおすすめしたい。一度、冬の南アルプスに登ると、気温がマイナス10度以上で、風速が15m以下の環境は楽勝だ、って気分になる。慣れというのは恐ろしい。ちなみに車に着いた時は真っ暗だったので、上の写真は起きてから撮りました。

_DSC0801Nikon D5300 w/ AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G

本当に安心できたのは、雪の積もった林道を降りて、国道152号に合流してからだった。インパクトのある看板の店が少し気になったが、お腹が減っていないので高ボッチへと向かった。凍傷に罹っていることに気がついたのはドライブ中で、慌ててエアコンで温めた。ちょっと放置した時間が長すぎたと思う。林道に降りる前ぐらいから、深爪をしたような妙な感覚が指先にあった。しかし、凍傷にかかるのが初めてだったので、それが凍傷の症状だということになかなか気が付かなかった。次からはすぐにお湯で暖めるようにしようと思う。そう、もう次の山行の計画で頭がいっぱいだ。全く懲りてない。しかし、次はあまり衝動的に行動しないで、もう少し天候に合わせた計画を立てようと思う。

3 thoughts on “Alpine Shooting in Winter (2)

  1. Raymond Lara

    My god, Yuga san! That was a life or death adventure! I would have perished. The other night I went up to Mauna Kea at the 9,300 ft level at 35F to try some astrophotography and I was cold. I suppose that tells me I need more clothes. I will leave the mountaineering to you. That was some tense reading, I could feel the severity of your situation. Take care, and I hope your fingers will be okay. What a story!!!

    Reply
  2. kris esplin

    Hi Yuga, thanks for the adventure! You’re living life to the full and creating great art along the way. Bravo!

    Reply
  3. Mac Hayes

    Outstanding essay! Outstanding photos!
    This brings back to me hiking up the Mt. Whitney trail in 1980; a much easier hike, only one place where one needs to scramble over a ledge rather than just walking. It was relatively easy up to the 14,000 foot level, if one is in good condition – then suddenly the last 495 ft. of climb was very tiring even though it was only a shallow climb from that point. Oh, if only I had more than Kodachrome to record that climb.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *